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Buckingham Palace anger at Labour bid to drag the Queen into bitter row over the publication of Brexit papers

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image Fears have been raised that the Queen (pictured in Hyde Park last week) could be dragged into the bitter row raging over Brexit after Labour used an arcane parliamentary procedure known as the humble address to force the Government to publish Brexit pape

Labour used parliamentary procedure to force publication Brexit impact reports

  • But the move, known as, 'humble address', requires a response from the Queen 
  • Sparked fury in Palace amid fears the monarch could be dragged into Brexit row 

Buckingham Palace is said to be 'not happy' after Labour tried to drag the Queen into a bitter row over the publication of Brexit papers.

The party last night deployed a rarely used parliamentary procedure known as the 'humble address' to force the Government to publish Brexit impact reports. 

The Commons passed the motion unanimously after the Tories refused to vote against it amid fears of a backbench rebellion.

But the move has sparked a backlash in the Palace as by convention the Queen must respond to a humble address.

This has sparked fears the monarch - who has always been fiercely non political - will be dragged into the Brexit row.

A senior government source told The Telegraph: 'The Palace is not happy.

'It risks dragging the Crown into political issues.' 

A Palace spokesman said the Queen would not get involved in discussions on Brexit saying: 'Parliamentary procedures are a matter for Parliament.'

The Government has insisted the 58 reports are sensitive and publication could damage negotiations in Brussels

While Parliament voted last night to publish the reports, it is expected ministers will only release redacted versions  with much of the information blanked out.

Shadow Brexit Secretary Sir Keir Starmer told demanded that the full reports are published 'by the end of the week'.

But Brexit minister Robin Walker simply said the Government would be 'responding to it' when it is ready.

Labour last night passed a Commons motion calling for full publication of 58 reports on the economic impact of Brexit and drafted it in a way Speaker John Bercow (pictured in the Commons last night) said would 'traditionally' be seen as binding

Labour last night passed a Commons motion calling for full publication of 58 reports on the economic impact of Brexit and drafted it in a way Speaker John Bercow (pictured in the Commons last night) said would 'traditionally' be seen as binding

Junior Brexit minister Robin Walker (pictured during last night's debate) has hinted redacted summaries could eventually be published to satisfy the House of Commons resolution

Junior Brexit minister Robin Walker (pictured during last night's debate) has hinted redacted summaries could eventually be published to satisfy the House of Commons resolution

Last night's motion was the latest in a string of votes forced by Labour which the Tories have chosen not to oppose amid fears their wafer thin majority would not hold.  

Speaker John Bercow last night said the humble address vote would 'traditionally' be seen as binding.

Mr Bercow confirmed Labour's motion was a 'different type' to normal opposition motions the Government routinely ignores but stopped short of calling for action against ministers. 

Tory MPs abstained when the Labour motion was put to the Commons tonight, meaning it passed unopposed. Tory whips expected to lose if they contested the motion.  

Shadow Brexit Secretary Sir Keir Starmer (pictured in the Commons last night) led challenges to Speaker Bercow to declare whether ignoring the motion would be a 'contempt of the House'

Shadow Brexit Secretary Sir Keir Starmer (pictured in the Commons last night) led challenges to Speaker Bercow to declare whether ignoring the motion would be a 'contempt of the House'

The Commons repeatedly descended into farcical procedural rows as furious MPs lashed the Government for defying the will of the House.

Labour used an arcane procedure to format its motion as a 'humble address' to the Queen - meaning in theory the Palace is now supposed to order publication.

Remain supporting MPs claimed defying the resolution would leave the Government in 'contempt' of Parliament.

Shadow Brexit Secretary Sir Keir Starmer led challenges to Speaker Bercow to declare whether ignoring the motion would be a 'contempt of the House'.  

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